Price Prize

CCAPP announces the 9th Annual Price Prize recipients:
Charlotte Mason of UCLA
Nicholas Rodd of MIT

Charlotte's research focuses on the evolution of galaxies at very high redshifts, including those formed just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, and the relationship between cosmic reionization and galaxy evolution in the early universe.

Nick's research focuses on the structure and experimental signatures associated with beyond the standard model phenomena. His current focus is dark matter and a potential signal seen in the galactic center.

Each will visit CCAPP in Spring/Summer 2017 for about a week and will give a special seminar. The continued generosity of the donors made it possible to offer two prizes this year.

Dr. Pliny A. and Margaret H. Price Prize in Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics

The Dr. Pliny A. and Margaret H. Price Prize was established in 2009 by a generous gift of $127,000 from Steve Price and Jill Levy to support the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics in the Department of Physics. The endowment is named after Steve's parents.


The Price Prize will be awarded annually to graduate students in recognition of research excellence in areas closely related to CCAPP science initiatives. Award recipients will be selected by the CCAPP Science Board based on a review of their research in the areas of cosmology and astroparticle physics.


Price Prize winners will spend an extended period visiting CCAPP, give the Price Prize seminar on their research, and receive a $1500 honorarium. The continued generosity of the donors makes it possible to offer two prizes some years.


We welcome nominees working in all areas of cosmology or astroparticle physics, graduate students going into their final year of their PhD. Students who did or will complete their PhD within 2017 are not eligible. Our primary criterion is exceptional scientific promise. We especially welcome nominations of women or other under-represented groups.


CCAPP announces the 8th Annual Price Prize recipients:
Susan Clark of Columbia University
Yuan-Sen Ting of Harvard University

Clark's research focuses on magnetic fields and their interaction with the interstellar medium, including the development and use of a new polarized foreground mapping technique using neutral hydrogen data. Polarized foreground maps make it possible to search cosmic microwave background data for signatures of cosmic inflation.

Ting's research focuses on understanding the Milky Way galaxy through the technique of "chemical tagging,” which aims to unravel the fossil record of Galactic evolution encoded in the present-day chemical and kinematic properties of stars. As part of this effort, Ting is developing new tools for measuring the properties of stars from large spectroscopic surveys.

Each will visit CCAPP in Autumn 2016 for about a week and will give a special seminar. The continued generosity of the donors made it possible to offer two prizes this year.

CCAPP announces the 7th Annual Price Prize recipients:
    Eric Carlson of the University of California, Santa Cruz
    Adrian Price-Whelan of the Columbia University

Carlson works on the phenomenology and indirect detection of particle dark matter candidates, as well as improved modelling and characterization of astrophysical backgrounds in cosmic ray and gamma-ray studies.

Price-Whelan's research interests are on tidal streams and Galactic dynamics.


Each will visit CCAPP in September 2015 for about a week and will give a special seminar. The continued generosity of the donors made it possible to offer two prizes this year.

CCAPP announces the Sixth Annual Price Prize recipients: Shea Garrison-Kimmel of the University of California, Irvine, and Alessandro Sonnenfeld of the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Garrison-Kimmel is working on studies of dwarf galaxies near the Milky Way and Andromeda as probes the physics of the larger Universe, including the nature of dark matter, the small-scale physics of star formation, and the interplay between dark matter and baryons.

Sonnenfeld is working on studies of massive elliptical galaxies, from how much dark matter they contain and how it is distributed to how the interplay of dark matter and ordinary matter leads to the observed properties of these galaxies, probed with direct observations and through the gravitational lensing of background galaxies.


Each will visit CCAPP in Autumn 2014 for about a week and will give a special seminar. The continued generosity of the donors made it possible to offer two prizes this year.

CCAPP announces the Fifth Annual Price Prize recipients:
Jessica Stockham of the University of Kansas and Liang Dai of Johns Hopkins University

Liang is a theorist; he is working on identifying signatures of the seeds of structure formed just after the Big Bang, when the universe was extremely young, dense, and hot.

Stockham is an experimentalist; she is working on new techniques to detect ultra-high-energy neutrinos and cosmic rays and to determine the nature of their sources.


Each will visit CCAPP in Fall 2013 for about a week and will give a special seminar. The continued generosity of the donors made it possible to offer two prizes this year.

CCAPP announces the Fourth Annual Price Prize recipients:
Charlotte Strege of Imperial College, London and Chris Williams the University of Chicago.

Strege is a theorist; she is probing the unknown particle properties of dark matter through combining results from astrophysical, underground, and collider experiments. Williams is an experimentalist; he is working on new techniques to detect the highest-energy particles in the universe, seeking clues to their unknown origins.

Each will visit CCAPP in Fall 2012 for about a week and will give a special seminar. The continued generosity of the donors made it possible to offer two prizes this year.

2011 Winners

CCAPP announces the Third Annual Price Prize recipients:
Sayan Chakraborti of Tata Institute and Michele Fumagalli of Santa Cruz.

Chakraborti works on the mechanisms and consequences of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. Fumagalli works on how galaxies and their stars form across cosmic time. An unusual aspect of their work is that each has worked on both theory and observation.

Each will visit CCAPP in 2012 for about a week and will give a special seminar. The continued generosity of the donors made it possible to offer two prizes this year.

2010 Winner

CCAPP announces the Second Annual Price Prize recipient: Jo Bovy of New York University.

As a current physics PH.D. student at NYU, Mr. Bovy is doing research at the Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics (CCPP). He received his Masters in Physics and Mathematics from Katholieke University Leuven, Belgium in 2005. His research focuses on the MIlky Way as well as topics related to the transparency of the Universe and non-gravitational interactions in the dark sector.

2009 Winner

CCAPP announces the inaugural Price Prize recipient: Charlie Conroy of Princeton University.

Mr. Conroy received his B.A. in Physics and Astrophysics from UC-Berkeley (2005) and is currently finishing his graduate degree at Princeton. His award recognizes his remarkable research accomplishments in the areas of galaxy formation, large scale structure, and, more recently, the use of the colors and spectra of galaxies as a tool to infer the properties of their stellar populations. He will be visiting CCAPP during May.

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